Research!

March 2, 2010

Amy

I was struck by Amy’s presentation, which spurred me to do some further research.  She presented an article that examined the prevalence and influence of smoking videos on YouTube.  In the top 50 search results for ’smoking,’ there were more pro-smoking videos, but the anti-smoking videos were more popular.

In conclusion, the more attractive the video, be it pro- or anti-smoking, the more influential it is.  This is a good criterion for the upcoming class video project.

Additional criteria for top videos included:  Categories- comedy, entertainment, music; 2-5 minutes and encoded, and new every 3 days.

James

Wow.                 # of films in film history    =      # of videos posted on YouTube every 15 days

That’s staggering.  Of course there is a vast difference between the length and quality of feature films and brief online video posts, but the overall point is that the mass proliferation of videos on YouTube is staggering.

Additionally, James noted that popular videos tend to swell in popularity, whereas unpopular/niche videos descend into obsolescence.  Hence, amidst all of the competition, it is worth it to produce a quality video and put everything into promoting its popularity.

Megan

What struck me most about Megan’s whole presentation was a single statement that she quoted.    In effect, it was that you cannot engage in deep thought in constant blips in Twitter, and that continuous partial thought doesn’t help us contribute anything significant.

As a result, I deeply felt a desire to create engaging videos–not provocative–but thought-provoking; different.  That’s significant.  There’s a lot of ways to achieve that, and I would really like to study different advertisements and videos that stand out as poignant, thought-prov0king pieces that have incite pondering. I know that sounds vague, but it really excites me.

Zane

Aside from the cookies, Zane’s presentation was great in the fact that it showed what many other religions are doing online, ranging from the super-conservative churches that have virtually no presence online, to those who seem to only exist on the internet.     It helps me appreciate the intelligent and professional efforts the Church has chosen to make  about its online presence.

More to be posted soon.

March 2, 2010

Amy

I was struck by Amy’s presentation, which spurred me to do some further research.  She presented an article that examined the prevalence and influence of smoking videos on YouTube.  In the top 50 search results for ‘smoking,’ there were more pro-smoking videos, but the anti-smoking videos were more popular.

In conclusion, the more attractive the video, be it pro- or anti-smoking, the more influential it is.  This is a good criterion for the upcoming class video project.

Additional criteria for top videos included:  Categories- comedy, entertainment, music; 2-5 minutes and encoded, and new every 3 days.

James

Wow.                 # of films in film history    =      # of videos posted on YouTube every 15 days

That’s staggering.  Of course there is a vast difference between the length and quality of feature films and brief online video posts, but the overall point is that the mass proliferation of videos on YouTube is staggering.

Additionally, James noted that popular videos tend to swell in popularity, whereas unpopular/niche videos descend into obsolescence.  Hence, amidst all of the competition, it is worth it to produce a quality video and put everything into promoting its popularity.

Megan

What struck me most about Megan’s whole presentation was a single statement that she quoted.    In effect, it was that you cannot engage in deep thought in constant blips in Twitter, and that continuous partial thought doesn’t help us contribute anything significant.

As a result, I deeply felt a desire to create engaging videos–not provocative–but thought-provoking; different.  That’s significant.  There’s a lot of ways to achieve that, and I would really like to study different advertisements and videos that stand out as poignant, thought-prov0king pieces that have incite pondering. I know that sounds vague, but it really excites me.

Zane

Aside from the cookies, Zane’s presentation was great in the fact that it showed what many other religions are doing online, ranging from the super-conservative churches that have virtually no presence online, to those who seem to only exist on the internet.     It helps me appreciate the intelligent and professional efforts the Church has chosen to make  about its online presence.

More to be posted soon.

Social Media: New Methods, New Drawbacks, Unprecedented Benefits

February 12, 2010

Chris Gibson recently posted a major concern about online communication, especially in regards to sharing the gospel online:

“Facebook, MySpace and others has never really appealed to me because of its lack of personal interaction. To me those social media sites are very impersonal… I very much agree with Elder Ballard’s call for members to “join the conversation.” … I do however think it would be harder to share the gospel online rather than face to face…  From my own personal experience when teaching, being able to see the way a person’s face changes, moves, the body language, the environment surrounding the person, is all essential for an effective lesson to be taught and received. If you teach online, it is harder to see firsthand everything that is going one.”     futuredoc123.wordpress.com

I could hardly agree more with Chris.  I’m taking a Communication Studies class right now, and our focus this week has been on nonverbal communication.  We reviewed several sets of data and situational examples which suggested that we generally trust nonverbal communication more than we do verbal communication.  For example, when you see an old friend and they say, “It’s good to see you,” the tone of their voice could suggest bright sincerity, it could be distanced and distracted, or a number of other possibilities.  Based off of their tone of voice and body language, they could send a message that actually overrides their verbal message–which gives you a great advantage in face-to-face encounters.  Online text simply removes all of that from you (even if the person adds an assortment of smiley faces to his or her message).

Chris did mention that the internet does provide high connectability, however; this is something Sarah mentioned in her blog:

“Recently I have helped my mother create a blog entitled LDS Motherhood where she can share her experiences and testimony as she strives to bring her family closer to the Lord. I know this will be a tremendous strength to my siblings and family who care to follow her blog.”   accordionpolka.wordpress.com

So, what about Sarah’s siblings and family who won’t be around most of the year to receive their mother’s messages–both verbal and nonverbal?  The internet fills in the communicative gaps that would otherwise tromp on our lives.  In spite of its general lack of nonverbal cues (setting aside online videos and video chat), the internet holds vast potential for bridging gaps among people who would otherwise be hindered by distance and inconvenience.   And additionally, its communicative prowess is constantly improving 🙂

Hello world!

January 7, 2010

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